Vanessa Jacoby, PhD, is an Assistant Professor and Licensed Clinical Psychologist with a child specialization in the Division of Behavioral Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center. Though each child's reaction to stress is unique, we know that children of deployed parents are at an increased risk for these difficulties when compared with military children whose parents did not deploy1. Communities, neighborhoods, schools and extended family play a significant role in the well-being of military children during deployment. Lastly, previously acquired developmental milestones, such as using the potty, sleeping through the night, or talking in sentences, may temporarily back-track. The Children of Military Service Members Challenges, Supports, and Future Educational Research. Make them aware of any special needs, and advocate for getting support with the transition. It begins with a review of the basic demographics of military families and a discussion of the variability among military families. The wellness of military children should be approached at more than the individual level, as the greater community environment has a significant impact on children’s psychological health during deployment as well. Military children typically attend between seven to nine schools before they graduate, moving approximately every two years. A child of a deployed or recently returned service member may experience increased worry about the safety of their parent or anxiety when separated from either of their parents. The Children of Military Service Members Challenges, Supports, and Future Educational Research. Additionally, current programs need to be expanded, and would ideally focus on more comprehensive approaches to social stability and reducing the stigma associated with seeking mental health care. Further, military families are particularly vulnerable to the negative repercussions of the favorite child complex. We’re in a unique position where we may meet someone one day in the United States, and either never see them again in your life or you may run into that person again years down the road, when you’re both living in a place like Germany. When family members find meaning in the service member’s work, they tend to function better. Future studies should focus on identifying the specific strengths and assets that help military children function well during a deployment, including reviews of current interventions to determine their success in helping military children and families throughout the deployment process. I learned that growing up as a Military Brat meant not just being part of a military family, but being part of the military family. If your child is serious about wanting to attend a military academy, you’ll need to start thinking about the application process during the early years of high school. Because previous research has introduced the important role siblings play in an individual’s well-being, in the future, researchers should focus on the challenges facing brothers and sisters of service members, as well as the impact siblings have on military children. Military Children from WAMU's Breaking Ground project sheds light on the challenges of being the child of soldiers. I'm Stephanie Himel-Nelson and I'm excited to be hosting this chat today. Military Children from WAMU's Breaking Ground project sheds light on the challenges of being the child of soldiers. Writing about the challenges you've faced during military life can set you apart from other college applicants. Editor’s Note: Elizabeth Howe, the daughter of U.S. Air Force Brig.

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